How Precise is Your Watch? Test It with the Lepsi Watch Scope


For everyone who’s ever read a watch test or review in WatchTime and wished they could test their own timepieces for accuracy at home — and without making the major investment of a Witschi timing machine — Geneva-based Lepsi has an ideal stocking stuffer: the Lepsi Watch Scope, essentially a stethoscope to read the “heartbeat” of a mechanical watch.

The Watch Scope is a compact device (retailing for 369 Swiss francs) that syncs with your smartphone to measure a mechanical watch’s vital stats — including rate variation, amplitude and beat error — in just seconds. Best of all, it is small enough to carry around with you, meaning you can actually bring it on a trip to a retailer to measure the accuracy on-site of a timepiece you’re considering purchasing.

 

Lepsi Watch Scope w/ smartphone

To use the Watch Scope, you first need to download (either from the Google Play or Apple App store) the Lepsi Watch Scope app for installation on your smartphone. While connected to wifi, open the app and activate it using a code provided on the device. Calibrating the device will take about three hours, and will only need to be done once. After calibration is complete, and the Watch Scope is connected to your smartphone, it is ready to use, and can be positioned in three different ways, depending on the watch and your preference: you can place the Scope’s soft-touch side directly on the dial while it is on your wrist; place the dial of the watch, facing downward, on the soft-touch side; or place the soft-touch side on the caseback (movement side) of the watch — the recommended position for “quieter” timepieces.

Lepsi Watch Scope - in hand

On your smartphone, with the app open, simply click on “Quick Measurement” and then “Start.” After 30 seconds, you’ll be able to get a reading on the watch in the above-mentioned categories — rate variation, from -1,000 to +1,000 seconds per day (accurate to within 0.01 seconds/day); amplitude, from 80º to 360º (accurate to within 1º); beat error, from 0 to 10 milliseconds (accurate to within 0. 1 ms); and also measure lift angle, adjustable from 10º to 90º. If you’re an owner of multiple watches — as we assume, if you’re reading this, that many of you are — the Watch Scope offers another useful feature: it records all measurement in a database that can be stored in your phone, enabling you to keep tabs on all the timepieces in your collection over the years and take note of when one is in need of servicing.

Lepsi Watch Scope - wristwatch

The Lepsi Watch Scope is compatible with devices running iOS 8 and above (with iPhone 5/5S/5C/6/6 Plus, iPad 3/4/5, and iPod touch) and Android 4.4 and above (with a high-end device). Measuring only 35 x 35 x 12 mm, and weighing just 25 grams, it makes an ideal stocking stuffer for the avid watch collector and enthusiast. More info at www.lepsi.ch.

5 Responses to “How Precise is Your Watch? Test It with the Lepsi Watch Scope”

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  1. Leslie lam

    It is very costly of the testing device. At this moment very new to convince public to believe in it. I see that there is still a long long way to be proved it really can be acceptable to the public.

    Reply
  2. Fran Oldham

    If you want a really accurate check on the time displayed by your watch (mechanical, quartz or thermocompensated quartz) take a video (on almost any digital camera or video camera) of your watch and the Emerald Sequoia display on an iPad or computer and then play the video frame by frame (1 frame = 1/30 = 0,033sec). It makes you dissatisfied with seconds per day!

    Reply
  3. Thank you for that tip and Lipsey watch scope I will be enquiring into it sounds very interesting sorry about the pun

    Reply
  4. Marcus J Arons

    It is wonderful and very reassuring to an adventures and pioneering mind to see the advances in technology. But the beauty of horology is still in the practical implementation of such knowledge applied to perfection for man kinds benefit. Basics are the most reward achievements the normal man can achieve.

    Reply
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