FEATURE

Zooming in: 7 Watch Movements in Extreme Close-Up


Finely finished watch movements come to life under magnification. The seven shown here were certainly ready for their close-ups. (To see the watch that gets powered by each movement, just click on the right arrow.)

1. Hublot

In the manually wound Caliber HUB9005, 11 vertically arranged barrels provide a power reserve of 50 days. Hublot includes a special power tool with each watch to make sure the winding process doesn’t also last for days. The hours, minutes, and power reserve are shown on cylinders; there’s a vertical tourbillon, too.

2. Corum

The Golden Bridge movement, created by Vincent Calabrese for Corum in 1980, has long been a cult object. In 2011, the brand upgraded the Golden Bridge with an automatic winding mechanism. Naturally, given the Golden Bridge’s unorthodox structure, the movement doesn’t have a traditional winding rotor; instead the winding weight moves linearly along two rails.

3. Montblanc

The hand-wound Caliber MB M68.40 from Montblanc gives the time in two time zones. It also powers two 24-hour rings that rotate around models of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. An added bonus is the patented tourbillon with a cylindrical balance spring, spinning at 12 o’clock.

4. Vacheron Constantin

A tourbillon that runs for two weeks? Amazing! With the hand-wound Caliber 2260, Vacheron Constantin has created a real long-distance runner.

5. Patek Philippe

Every lever, edge and screw recess has been meticulously finished in Patek Philippe’s hand-wound CHR 27-525 PS, a split-seconds chronograph movement. The work increases exponentially with a movement as complicated as this.

6. Roger Dubuis

Two tourbillons in a skeletonized environment give this watch a 3-D look. According to Roger Dubuis, 1,200 hours are needed to manufacture its manual-wind Caliber RD01SQ.

7. A. Lange & Söhne

With the manual-wind Caliber L043.5, the A. Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk, which shows the hour and minutes digitally in two windows, is upgraded to become a minute repeater. The repeater chimes the time in decimal fashion, ringing out 10-minute intervals rather than quarter hours, as most minute repeaters do.

Would you like to see more beautiful watches? Purchase our 2017 Design Issue now in the WatchTime Shop!

5 Responses to “Zooming in: 7 Watch Movements in Extreme Close-Up”

Show all responses
  1. Sylvio F. Bertoli

    The movement of the Patek Philippes are pure poetry. They more beautiful than the design of some of their contemporary models. which often makes me think that PP produces some of the most expensive ugly watches in the world.

    Reply
  2. Sylvio F. Bertoli

    Some movements are so beautifully assembled that it is just too bad that the lack of a sapphire glass in the back case of the vintage pieces prevents most users from enjoying these beauties in action.

    Reply
Leave a Reply